Monday, March 31, 2003

 
Sunday Commentary: Cleaning up the assignment board

I have had a consistent string of “almost” and “whoops” when putting together my Sunday articles. So, since none of these will stand up on their own as they are, I’ll clean off the Meatstack Assignment Board, and put them up as they stand.

Jim Capozzola for Senate?

Jim Capazzola over at the Rittenhouse Review has been considering a run against Pennsylvania incumbent Arlen Specter. He’s sort of formed an “exploratory committee” by throwing out the idea, and seeing what bloggers respond.

I’ll be the first to agree that Specter’s time has passed. Do keep in mind, Specter is the same person who threw together the “magic bullet” theory, stating that bullets, when traveling at and through a President of the United States of America, do not need to follow the same rules of physics that the rest of the universe adheres to.

The Meatstack Assignment Desk (Assignment Editor: Ernest) Said to me: “This might be a good piece. Why don’t you contact him and get some background on him?” Good idea Ernest!

So, I attempt to contact Mr. Capazzola via Email. I ask him a couple of questions, trying to get a feel for what he stands for, what his background is, and what he believes.

He replies, quite prudently I must admit, that those questions cannot be answered at this time.

However, The Meatstack cannot support, at this time, a possible candidate whenever we know nothing of him. If Mr. Capozzola decides to take a serious run at Senator Specter, and is willing to provide some background on himself, then The Meatstack will reconsider throwing our support for him.

What if a protest happens, and no one is there to listen?

Saturday morning started like any other for me. Working third shift at my job, I get to bed at approximately 5 a.m. Waking up at 11:30 a.m., I decide to head to to the corner of Broadway and High street in Columbus, Ohio. There is supposed to be a anti-war protest rally happening. Grabbing the camera, dog, and wife (not necessarily in that order) we get into the car, looking for a Sunday story with art. By the time we arrived at 1:15 p.m., the protest had broken up, the participants gone home.

Protest.net lists their events happening from 12 to 1 every Saturday. Another protest is scheduled for Sunday’s from 5 p.m. until 5:30 p.m., with dinner afterwards.

Although both of these groups are, in my opinion, arguing for the right cause, why the short sessions? I’m not suggesting the kind of “die-in” that shut down downtown New York last week, but at least put some heart into it. I’ve been in traffic jams longer than an hour.

And the Sunday protest is just silly.

I applaud what these groups are trying to do. I just wonder about the overall affect of such a short event.

Regards.

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